Recommendation

Friday, May 16, 2014

Carl Jung on the "Holy Ghost," "Christ," "Anti-Christ," "Crucifixion,"





“The continuing, direct operation of the Holy Ghost on those who are called to be God’s children implies, in fact, a broadening process of incarnation.

Christ, the son begotten by God, is the first-born who is succeeded by an ever-increasing number of younger brothers and sisters.
There are, however, neither begotten by the Holy Ghost nor born of a virgin. . . .

Their lowly origin (possibly from the mammals) does not prevent them from entering into a close kinship with God as their father and Christ as their brother.” - Carl Jung; Answer to Job

Image: The Holy Spirit depicted as a dove descending on the Holy Family, with God the Father and angels shown atop, by Murillo, c. 1677.


“Although the attributes of Christ (consubstantiality with the Father, co-eternity, filiation, parthenogenesis, crucifixion, Lamb sacrificed between opposites, One divided into Many, etc.) undoubtedly mark him out as an embodiment of the self, looked at from the psychological angle he corresponds to only one half of the archetype.

The other half appears as the Anti-Christ.

The latter is just as much a manifestation of the self, except that he consists of its dark aspect.

Both are Christian symbols, and they have the same meaning as the image of the Savior crucified between two thieves.

This great symbol tells us that the progressive development and differentiation of consciousness leads to an ever more menacing awareness of the conflict and involves nothing less than a crucifixion of the ego, its agonizing suspension between irreconcilable opposites. ~Carl Jung


“The utter failure came at the Crucifixion in the tragic words, ‘My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?’

If you want to understand the full tragedy of those words you must realize what they meant: Christ saw that his whole life, devoted to the truth according to his best conviction, had been a terrible illusion.

He had lived it to the full absolutely sincerely, he had made his honest experiment, but it was nevertheless a compensation.
On the cross his mission deserted him. But because he had lived so fully and devotedly he won through to the Resurrection body.” - Carl Jung; C.G. Jung Speaking