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Thursday, August 13, 2015

Carl Jung on Saint Paul




The idea of angels, archangels, “principalities and powers” in St. Paul, the archons of the Gnostics, the heavenly hierarchy of Dionysius the Areopagite, all come from the perception of the relative autonomy of the archetypes. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Page 66, Para 104.

Please give X. my best greetings and tell him-because his love is all too easily injured-he should meditate on Paul's words in the Epistle to the Corinthians: "Love endureth all things." ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 120-121.

These signs appear in Gnosticism, St. Paul's sayings are undoubtedly connected with Gnosticism. ~Carl Jung, ETH Lecture 8March1935, Pages 199.

I don't believe in the tiger who was finally converted to vegetarianism and ate only apples. My solace was always Paul, who did not deem it beneath his dignity to admit he bore a thorn in the flesh. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 276-277.

Paul for instance was not converted to Christianity by intellectual or philosophical endeavor or by a belief, but by the force of his immediate experience. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 183.

Paul for instance was not converted to Christianity by intellectual or philosophical endeavor or by a belief, but by the force of his immediate experience. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 183.

The Christian Church has hitherto. . . [recognized] Christ as the one and only God-man.

But the indwelling of the Holy Ghost, the third Divine Person, in man, brings about a Christification of many, and the question then arises whether these many are all complete God-men. . . .

It is well to remind ourselves of St. Paul and his split consc iousness: on one side he felt he was the apostle directly called and enlightened by God, and, on the other side, a sinful man who could not pluck out the "thorn in the flesh" and rid himself of the Satanic angel who plagued him.

That is to say even the enlightened person remains what he is, and is never more than his own limited ego before the One who dwells within him, whose form has no knowable boundaries, who encompasses him on all sides, fathomless as the abysms of the earth and vast as the sky. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Page 470.

St. Paul's concept of ayvoia (ignorantia) may not be too far removed from dyiwia, since both mean the initial, unconscious condition of man. ~Carl Jung, Aion, Pages 191-192.

As St. Paul said, "I am redeemed and am freed from the law."

The earliest source about the Resurrection is St. Paul, and he is no eyewitness, but he strongly emphasizes the absolute and vital importance of resurrection as well as the authenticity of the reports. (Cf. I Cor. 15:14 and 15:5".)