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Wednesday, October 7, 2015

Some Carl Jung Quotations [2]



It is the tradition that a satori experience is imageless and they therefore say it was imageless. That it cannot possibly have been imageless is proved by the fact that they remember something definite. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 466-467


It is the tradition that a satori experience is imageless and they therefore say it was imageless. That it cannot possibly have been imageless is proved by the fact that they remember something definite. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 466-467


You will surely have noticed in reading my writings that I do not mince my words and clearly and expressly point out that the regard for mythological parallels is conducive to a religious attitude. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 468


You will surely have noticed in reading my writings that I do not mince my words and clearly and expressly point out that the regard for mythological parallels is conducive to a religious attitude. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 468


It was the Enlightenment which destroyed this bulwark by reducing the unitary view to nothing but mythology. In its modern usage mythology simply means "it is nothing," since myths are unrealistic. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 468


My whole endeavour has been to show that myth is something very real because it connects us with the instinctive bases of our existence. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 468


One has to be extremely careful in using the word "mythology" as it brings you into head-on collision with the all-pervading infantile arguments of the Enlightenment. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 468


The real situation cannot, however, be clarified by mere concepts but only by the inner experience that corresponds to them. With concepts you invariably miss the mark because they are not philosophical ideas but merely names for experiences. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 468-469


These divine gifts are apt to get us too far away from our earthly bondage and from our inexorable reality. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 471-473


God is light and darkness, the auctor rerum is love and wrath. We still pray: "Lead us not into temptation." (The French Catholic version of the Vulgate has: "Let us not fall into temptation."!) ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 471-473


Since self-knowledge is one of the more difficult arts, it is scarcely to be hoped that many men will take the trouble to search their conscience and consider how much their decision depends on their subjective relations with women. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 475-476


The bird signifies the aerial, volatile spirit (in the chemical sense "spirit" is volatile, but it also designates the Spiritus Sanctus), whose physical and spiritual meanings are united in the alchemical spiritus Mercurialis. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 476-477


I myself recently dreamed that a UFO came speeding towards me which turned out to be the lens of a magic lantern whose projected image was myself; this suggested to me that I was the figure, himself deep in meditation, who is produced by a meditating yogi. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 476-477


These [UFO] symbolisms, which are cropping up everywhere nowadays, paint a picture of the end of time with its eschatological conceptions: destruction of the world, coming of the Kingdom of Heaven or of the world redeemer. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 476-477


At all times there have been wise and shrewd women to whom even clever men have gone for advice. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 477-478


There are countless women who succeed in public life without losing their femininity. On the contrary, they succeeded precisely because of it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 477-478


There are countless women who succeed in public life without losing their femininity. On the contrary, they succeeded precisely because of it. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 477-478


The unpleasant power-complex of the female animus is encountered only when a woman does not allow her feeling to express itself naturally or handles it in an inferior way. But this, as said, can happen in all situations of life and has nothing whatever to do with the right to vote. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 477-478


It [Individuation] does indeed, as you say, make considerable demands on our constitution. It goes to the very limit, but no further. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 479-480


Most people cannot reach their destinies anyway without a streak of craziness, and so long as they haven't it is better not to exorcize their demons. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 479-480


It is only from the purely human standpoint that the divine game is seen as a sickness, a leprosy, a perilous threat to the bond with human society. It is therefore advisable not to rant about it but to carry on the work in secret. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 479-480


I myself am deeply convinced of the basic analogy between physical and psychological discoveries. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 469-471


I have often discussed this problem with the late Prof. Pauli, who was also fascinated by what he called the mirror-reflection, causing the existence of two worlds which are really united in the speculum, the mirror, that is lying in the middle. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 469-471


Without his emphasis on the dark side of man and the chaos of his chthonic desires, I could not have found access to the "Mysterium Coniunctionis." ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 469-471


Above all you cannot hope to "collaborate" in some way, for where in our time and our society would you find a person who knew how to express what your uniqueness alone can express? This is the jewel that must not get lost. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 480-481.