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Saturday, October 17, 2015

Some Carl Jung Quotations [V]




Recognizing the shadow is what I call the apprentice piece, but making out with the anima is the masterpiece which not many can bring off. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 481


The difference between the two kinds of thinking struck me a long time ago, and for my domestic use I have described the first kind as two-dimensional and the second kind as three-dimensional. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 481-482


Paradoxically, as you rightly point out, this centre has to be created although it has always been there. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 481-482


Thank you for telling me about Ringbom's book. [Graltempel und paradies, 1951] For several years now it has been in my wife's library; she was engaged in a study of the Grail up to her death in 1955. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 481-482


I must call your attention to the fact that I cannot possibly tell you what a man who has enjoyed complete self-realization looks like, and what becomes of him. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 474-475


Before we strive after perfection, we ought to be able to live the ordinary man without self-mutilation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 474-475


If anybody should find himself after his humble completion still left with a sufficient amount of energy, then he may begin his career as a saint. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 474-475


I distinguish between "religion" and "creed"; the one is generic, the other specific. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


The distance between God and man is so great that Yahweh sees himself obliged to set up an embassy among men-the ambassador is his own son-and to deliver a missive to them (the gospel). ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


His [Hegel’s] impossible language, which he shares with his blood-brother Heidegger, denotes that his philosophy is a highly rationalized and lavishly decorated confession of his unconscious. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 500-502


The fact that I use the term "dialectical procedure" or something of this sort exposes me to the misunderstanding that I envisage an intellectual procedure, which is not the case, but in truth a practical method of dealing with the very concrete propositions the unconscious presents us with. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 500-502


Moreover the science of all moving as well as living bodies is based upon the concept of energy. Energy itself is a tension between opposites. Our psychology is no exception to the principle that embraces about the whole of natural science. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 500-502


In the intellectual world in which I grew up, Hegelian thought played no role at all; on the contrary, it was Kant and his epistemology on the one hand, and on the other straight materialism, which I never shared, knowing too much about its ridiculous mythology. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 500-502


Clearly the anti-mythological trend is due to the difficulties we have in clinging on to our previous mythological tenets of belief. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


"Reason" is, notoriously, not necessarily ethical any more than intelligence is. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


Myth is pre-eminently a social phenomenon: it is told by the many and heard by the many. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


It [Myth] gives the ultimately unimaginable religious experience an image, a form in which to express itself, and thus makes community life possible, whereas a merely subjective religious experience lacking the traditional mythic imagery remains inarticulate and asocial, and, if it does anything at all, it fosters a spiritually anchoritic life. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


Although the anchorite does not represent a model for living, the solitude of religious experience can be, and will be, an unavoidable and necessary transitional phase for everyone who seeks the essential experience, that is to say the primordial religious experience. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


If his individual experience is a living thing, it will share the quality of all life, which does not stagnate but, being in continual flux, brings ever new aspects to light. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


The old myth, which always holds within it something yet older and more aboriginal, remains the same, this being an essential quality of all forms of religion; it only undergoes a new interpretation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


Nowadays one very often hears people asserting that something or other is "only" psychic, as though there were anything that is not psychic. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


Outside psychology only modern physics has had to acknowledge that no science can be carried on without the psyche. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


For more than a hundred years the world has been confronted with the concept of an unconscious, and for more than fifty years with the empirical investigation of it, but only a very few people have drawn the necessary conclusions. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488