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Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Some Carl Jung Quotations [V]





Nobody seems to have noticed that without a reflecting psyche the world might as well not exist, and that, in consequence, consciousness is a second world-creator, and also that the cosmogonic myths do not describe the absolute beginning of the world but rather the dawning of consciousness as the second Creation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


Now whether these archetypes, as I have called these pre-existent and pre-forming psychic factors, are regarded as "mere" instincts or as daemons and gods makes no difference at all to their dynamic effect. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


But it often makes a mighty difference whether they [Archetypes] are undervalued as "mere" instincts or overvalued as gods. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


At the age of 84 I am somewhat tired, but I am concerned about our culture, which would be in danger of losing its roots if the continuity of tradition were broken. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 482-488


The philosophical influence that has prevailed in my education dates from Plato, Kant, Schopenhauer, Ed.v.Hartmann and Nietzsche. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 500-502


Aristotle's point of view had never particularly appealed to me; nor Hegel, who in my very incompetent opinion is not even a proper philosopher but a misfired psychologist. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 500-502


Another common misunderstanding is that I derive my idea of "archetypes" from Philo or Dionysius Areopagita, or St. Augustine. It is based solely upon empirical data, viz . upon the astonishing fact that products of the unconscious in modern individuals can almost literally coincide with symbols occurring in all peoples and all times, beyond the possibility of tradition or migration, for which I have given numerous proofs. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 500-502


That is what the child reacts to-to the quiddity of the father, without knowing that this quiddity once exemplified itself in an act. Nothing is in us that was not there before, and nothing that has once been can vanish. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 502


Words have become much too cheap. Being is more difficult and is therefore fondly replaced by verbalizing. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 502-503


Who or what is hindering man from living peacefully on this earth? ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 506


In dealing with a definitely historical text it is absolutely essential to know the language and the whole available tradition of the milieu in question and not to adduce amplifications from a later cultural milieu. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 507-508


The other dream points to the coming shock, a complete shattering of your view of the world, as a result of which you and your anima fall into the depths-the catacombs. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 507-508



Intuition is a dangerous gift, tempting us over and over again into groundless speculation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 507-508



An intuition needs an uncommonly large dose of sobering criticism, otherwise it exposes us only too easily to the kind of catastrophic experience that has befallen you. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 507-508


Everything could be said much more simply, but this simplicity is just what we ourselves and others lack, with the result that it is more trouble for us to speak really simply than to speak in a rather complicated and roundabout way. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 508-509


The simplest is the most difficult of all, because, in the process of reaching consciousness, it breaks up into many individual aspects in which the mind gets entangled and cannot find a suitably simple expression. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 508-509


Only numinous experiences retain their original simplicity or oneness which still gives us intimations of the Unus Mundus. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 508-509


According to my view, one should rather say that the term "God" should only be applied in case of numinous inconceivability. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 511-512


Her masculine aspect is expressed very clearly in the anima figure in the Song of Songs: "terrible as an army with banners." ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 508-509


These opposites are in reality united in the irrepresentable because transcendent self, which in the process of becoming conscious divides into opposites again through progressive dichotomy. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 508-509


In dealing with space man has produced-since time immemorial -the circle and the square, which are connected with the idea of shelter and protection, place of the hearth, concentration of the family and small animals, and on a higher level the symbol of the quadratura circuli, as the dwelling place of the "inner man," the abode of the gods, etc. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 509-510


The androgyny of the anima may appear in the anima herself at a certain stage, but it derives at a higher level from unity of the self. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Page 508-509


Any development that leads further away from the round and the square becomes increasingly neurotic and unsatisfactory, particularly so when the elements of the building, i.e., the rooms, lose their approximation to the round or the square. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 509-510



A certain interplay of round and square seems to be indispensable. This is about all I can tell you about "architectural archetypes." ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 509-510


It is rather conspicuous that the creators of modern art are unconscious about the meaning of their creations. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 511-512


Your general conclusion that contemporary Western artists unconsciously depict God's image is questionable, as it is by no means certain that any inconceivability could be called "God," unless one calls everything "God," as everything ends in inconceivability. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. II, Pages 511-512


Carl Jung across the web:

Carl Jung Depth Psychology Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/56536297291/

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