Page Level Ad

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Carl Jung on “Archetypes” - Anthology




The unconscious, as the totality of all archetypes, is the deposit of all human experience right back to its remotest beginnings.

Not, indeed, a dead deposit, a sort of abandoned rubbish-heap, but a living system of reactions and aptitudes that determine the
individual’s life in invisible ways —all the more effective because invisible.

It is not just a gigantic historical prejudice, so to speak, an a priori historical condition; it is also the source of the instincts,
for the archetypes are simply the forms which the instincts assume.

From the living fountain of instinct flows everything that is creative; hence the unconscious is not merely conditioned by
history, but is the very source of the creative impulse.

It is like Nature herself—prodigiously conservative, and yet transcending her own historical conditions in her acts of creation.

No wonder, then, that it has always been a burning question for humanity how best to adapt to these invisible determinants.

If consciousness had never split off from the unconscious—an eternally repeated event symbolized as the fall of the
angels and the disobedience of the first parents—this problem would never have arisen, any more than would the question of
environmental adaptation. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 339.

By means of “active imagination” we are put in a position of advantage, for we can then make the discovery of the archetype
without sinking back into the instinctual sphere, which would only lead to blank unconsciousness or, worse still, to
some kind of intellectual substitute for instinct. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 414

Whether this psychic structure and its elements, the archetypes, ever “originated” at all is a metaphysical question and therefore unanswerable. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 187.

The archetype—let us never forget this—is a psychic organ present in all of us. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 271

Man must remain conscious of the world of the archetypes, because in it he is still a part of Nature and is connected with his
own roots. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 174

The archetypes are imperishable elements of the unconscious, but they change their shape continually. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 301

When, towards middle life, the last gleam of childhood illusion fades—this it must be owned is true only of an almost ideal life, for many go as children to their graves—then the archetype of the mature man or woman emerges from the parental imago: an image of man as woman has known him from the beginning of time, and an image of woman that man carries within him eternally. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 74

All human control comes to an end when the individual is caught in a mass movement.

Then the archetypes begin to function, as happens also in the lives of individuals when they are confronted with situations that cannot be dealt with in any of the familiar ways. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para 395

Archetypes are, by definition, factors and motifs that arrange the psychic elements into certain images, characterized as
archetypal, but in such a way that they can be recognized only from the effects they produce.

They exist preconsciously, and presumably they form the structural dominants of the psyche in general.

They may be compared to the invisible presence of the crystal lattice in a saturated solution.

As a priori conditioning factors they represent a special, psychological instance of the biological “pattern of behaviour,” which gives all living organisms their specific qualities.

Just as the manifestations of this biological ground plan may change in the course of development, so also can those of the archetype.

Empirically considered, however, the archetype did not ever come into existence as a phenomenon of organic life, but entered into the picture with life itself. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 222.


It is only through the psyche that we can establish that God acts upon us, but we are unable to distinguish whether these actions emanate from God or from the unconscious.

We cannot tell whether God and the unconscious are two different entities.

Both are border-line concepts for transcendental contents.

But empirically it can be established, with a sufficient degree of probability, that there is in the unconscious an archetype of
wholeness which manifests itself spontaneously in dreams, etc., and a tendency, independent of the conscious will, to relate other
archetypes to this centre.

Consequently, it does not seem improbable that the archetype of wholeness occupies as such a central position which approximates it to the God-image. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 757

I am not, however, addressing myself to the happy possessors of faith, but to those many people for whom the light has gone out, the mystery has faded, and God is dead.

For most of them there is no going back, and one does not know either whether going back is always the better way.

To gain an understanding of religious matters, probably all that is left us today is the psychological approach.

That is why I take these thought-forms that have become historically fixed, try to melt them down again, and pour them into moulds of immediate experience.

It is certainly a difficult undertaking to discover connecting links between dogma and immediate experience of psychological archetypes, but a study of natural symbols of the unconscious gives us the necessary raw material. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 148.

It is in my view a great mistake to suppose that the psyche of a new-born child is a tabula rasa in the sense that there is absolutely nothing in it.

In so far as the child is born with a differentiated brain that is predetermined by heredity and therefore individualized, it meets sensory stimuli coming from outside not with any aptitudes, but with specific ones, and this necessarily results in a particular, individual choice and pattern of apperception.

These aptitudes can be shown to be inherited instincts and preformed patterns, the latter being the a priori and formal conditions of apperception that are based on instinct.

Their presence gives the world of the child and the dreamer its anthropomorphic stamp.

They are the archetypes, which direct all fantasy activity into its appointed paths and in this way produce, in the fantasy-images of children's dreams as well as in the delusions of schizophrenia, astonishing mythological parallels such as can also be found, though in lesser degree, in the dreams of normal persons and neurotics.

It is not, therefore, a question of inherited ideas but of inherited possibilities of ideas. ~Carl Jung, CW, 9i, Para 136

The original structural components of the psyche are of no less surprising a uniformity than are those of the visible body.

The archetypes are, so to speak, organs of the prerational psyche.

They are eternally inherited forms and ideas which have at first no specific content.

Their specific content only appears in the course of the individual's life, when personal experience is taken up in precisely these forms. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 845


Archetypes are like riverbeds which dry up when the water deserts them, but which it can find again at any time.

An archetype is like an old watercourse along which the water of life has flowed for centuries, digging a deep channel for itself.

The longer it has flowed in this channel the more likely it is that sooner or later the water will return to its old bed. ~Carl Jung, CW 10, Para -395

Archetypes were, and still are, living psychic forces that demand to be taken seriously, and they have a strange way of making sure of their effect.

Always they were the bringers of protection and salvation, and their violation has as its consequence the "perils of the soul" known to us from the psychology of primitives.

Moreover, they are the infallible causes of neurotic and even psychotic disorders, behaving exactly like neglected or maltreated physical organs or organic functional systems. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 266

Our personal psychology is just a thin skin, a ripple on the ocean of collective psychology.

The powerful factor, the factor which changes our whole life, which changes the surface of our known world, which makes history, is collective psychology, and collective psychology moves according
to laws entirely different from those of our consciousness.

The archetypes are the great decisive forces, they bring about the real events, and not our personal reasoning and practical intellect . . . The archetypal images decide the fate of man. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 183

All the most powerful ideas in history go back to archetypes.

This is particularly true of religious ideas, but the central concepts of science, philosophy, and ethics are no exception to this rule.

In their present form they are variants of archetypal ideas, created by consciously applying and adapting these ideas to reality.

For it is the function of consciousness not only to recognize and assimilate the external world through the gateway of the senses, but to translate into visible reality the world within us. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 342

I have often been asked where the archetype comes from and whether it is acquired or not.

This question cannot be answered directly.

Archetypes are, by definition, factors and motifs that arrange the psychic elements into certain images, characterized as archetypal, but in such a way that they can be recognized only from the effects they produce.

They exist preconsciously, and presumably they form the structural dominants of the psyche in general.

They may be compared to the invisible presence of the crystal lattice in a saturated solution.

As a priori conditioning factors they represent a special, psychological instance of the biological "pattern of behaviour," which gives all living organisms their specific qualities.

Just as the manifestations of this biological ground plan may change in the course of development, so also can those of the archetype.

Empirically considered, however, the archetype did not ever come into existence as a phenomenon of organic life, but entered into the picture with life itself. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 222

To the extent that the archetypes intervene in the shaping of conscious contents by regulating, modifying, and motivating them, they act like instincts.

It is therefore very natural to suppose that these factors are connected with the instincts and to enquire whether the typical situational patterns which these collective form-principles apparently represent are not in the end identical with the instinctual patterns, namely, with the patterns of behaviour. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 104

The archetype or primordial image might suitably be described as the instinct's perception of itself, or as the self portrait of the instinct, in exactly the same way as consciousness is an inward perception of the objective life process. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 277

We must constantly bear in mind that what we mean by "archetype" is in itself irrepresentable, but has effects which make visualizations of it possible, namely, the archetypal images and ideas.

We meet with a similar situation in physics: there the smallest particles are themselves irrepresentable but have effects from the nature of which we can build up a model.

The archetypal image, the motif or mythologem, is a construction of this kind. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 417

Sooner or later nuclear physics and the psychology of the unconscious will draw closer together as both of them, independently of one another and from opposite directions, push forward into transcendental territory, the one with the concept of the atom, the other with that of the archetype. ~Carl Jung, CW 9ii, Para 412


Just as the "psychic infra-red," the biological instinctual psyche, gradually passes over into the physiology of the organism and thus merges with its chemical and physical conditions, so the "psychic ultra-violet," the archetype, describes a field which exhibits none of the peculiarities of the physiological and yet, in the last analysis, can no longer be regarded as psychic. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 420

The archetypal representations (images and ideas) mediated to us by the unconscious should not be confused with the archetype as such.

They are very varied structures which all point back to one essentially "irrepresentable" basic form.

The latter is characterized by certain formal elements and by certain fundamental meanings, although these can be grasped only approximately.

The archetype as such is a psychoid factor that belongs, as it were, to the invisible, ultra-violet end of the psychic spectrum ... It seems to me probable that the real nature of the archetype is not
capable of being made conscious, that it is transcendent, on which account I call it psychoid [quasi-psychic]. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 417

transcendental background is as certain as our own existence, but it is equally certain that the direct perception of the archetypal world inside us is just as doubtfully correct as that of the physical world outside us. ~Carl Jung, CW 14, Para 787

In spite or perhaps because of its affinity with instinct, the archetype represents the authentic element of spirit, but a spirit which is not to be identified with the human intellect, since it is the latter's spiritus rector.

The essential content of all mythologies and all religions and all isms is archetypal.

The archetype is spirit or anti-spirit: what it ultimately proves to be depends on the attitude of the human mind.

Archetype and instinct are the most polar opposites imaginable, as can easily be seen when one compares a man who is ruled by his instinctual drives with a man who is seized by the spirit.

But, just as between all opposites there obtains so close a bond that no position can be established or even thought of without its corresponding negation, so in this case also "les extremes se touchent." ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 406

The archetype as an image of instinct is a spiritual goal toward which the whole nature of man strives; it is the sea to which all rivers wend their way, the prize which the hero wrests from the fight with the dragon. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 415

I can only gaze with wonder and awe at the depths and heights of our psychic nature.

Its non-spatial universe conceals an untold abundance of images which have accumulated over millions of years of living development and become fixed in the organism.

My consciousness is like an eye that penetrates to the most distant spaces, yet it is the psychic non-ego that fills them with non-spatial images.

And these images are not pale shadows, but tremendously powerful psychic factors.

The most we may be able to do is misunderstand them, but we can never rob them of their power by denying them.

Beside this picture I would like to place the spectacle of the starry heavens at night, for the only equivalent of the universe within is the universe without; and just as I reach this world through the medium of the body, so I reach that world through the medium of the psyche. ~Carl Jung, CW 4, Para 784

The organism confronts light with a new structure, the eye, and the psyche confronts the natural process with a symbolic image, which apprehends it in the same way as the eye catches the light.

And just as the eye bears witness to the peculiar and spontaneous creative activity of living matter, the primordial image expresses the intrinsic and unconditioned creative power of the psyche.

The primordial image is thus a condensation of the living process. ~Carl Jung CW CW6, Para 748

It is a great mistake in practice to treat an archetype as if it were a mere name, word, or concept.

It is far more than that: it is a piece of life, an image connected with the living individual by the bridge of emotion. ~Carl Jung, CW 18, Para 96

The so-called "forces of the unconscious" are not intellectual concepts that can be arbitrarily manipulated, but dangerous antagonists which can, among other things, work frightful devastation in the economy of the personality.

They are everything one could wish for or fear in a psychic "Thou."

The layman naturally thinks he is the victim of some obscure organic disease; but the theologian, who suspects it is the devil's work, is appreciably nearer to the psychological truth. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 659

In psychic matters we are dealing with processes of experience, that is, with transformations which should never be given hard and fast names if their having movement is not to petrify into something static.

The protean mythologeme and the shimmering symbol express the processes of the psyche far more trenchantly and, in the end, far more clearly than the clearest concept; for the symbol not only
conveys a visualization of the process but—and this is perhaps just as important—it also brings a re-experiencing of it, of that twilight which we can learn to understand only through inoffensive empathy, but which too much clarity only dispels. ~Carl Jung, CW 13, Para 199

The great problems of life, including of course sex, are always related to the primordial images of the collective unconscious.

These images are balancing and compensating factors that correspond to the problems which life confronts us with in reality.

This is no matter for astonishment, since these images are deposits of thousands of years of experience of the struggle for existence and for adaptation.

Every great experience in life, every profound conflict, evokes the accumulated treasure of these images and brings about their inner constellation.

But they become accessible to consciousness only when the individual possesses so much self-awareness and power of understanding that he also reflects on what he experiences instead of just living it
blindly.

In the latter event he actually lives the myth and the symbol without knowing it. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 373

The soul gives birth to images that from the rational standpoint of consciousness are assumed to be worthless.

And so they are, in the sense that they cannot immediately be turned to account in the objective world.

The first possibility of making use of them is artistic, if one is in any way gifted in that direction; a second is philosophical speculation; a third is quasi-religious, leading to heresy and the
founding of sects; and a fourth way of employing the dynatnis of these images is to squander it in every form of licentiousness. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 426

The symbol is a living body, corpus et anima; hence the "child" is such an apt formula for the symbol.

The uniqueness of the psyche can never enter wholly into reality, it can only be realized approximately, though it still remains the absolute basis of all consciousness.

The deeper "layers" of the psyche lose their individual uniqueness as they retreat farther and farther into darkness. "Lower down," that is to say as they approach the autonomous functional
systems, they become increasingly collective until they are universalized and extinguished in the body's materiality, i.e., in chemical substances.

The body's carbon is simply carbon. Hence "at bottom" the psyche is simply "world."

In this sense I hold Kerenyi to be absolutely right when he says that in the symbol the world itself is speaking.

The more archaic and "deeper," that is the more physiological, the symbol is, the more collective and universal, the more "material" it is.

The more abstract, differentiated, and specific it is, and the more its nature approximates to conscious uniqueness and individuality, the more it sloughs off its universal character.

Having finally attained full consciousness, it runs the risk of becoming a mere allegory which nowhere oversteps the bounds of conscious comprehension, and is then exposed to all sorts of attempts at
rationalistic and therefore inadequate explanation. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 291

Not for a moment dare we succumb to the illusion that an archetype can be finally explained and disposed of.

Even the best attempts at explanation are only more or less successful translations into another metaphorical language. (Indeed, language itself is only an image.)

The most we can do is to dream the myth onwards and give it a modern dress.

And whatever explanation or interpretation does to it, we do to our own souls as well, with corresponding results for our own well-being.

The archetype—let us never forget this—is a psychic organ present in all of us. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 271

In reality we can never legitimately cut loose from our archetypal foundations unless we are prepared to pay the price of a neurosis, any more than we can rid ourselves of our body and its organs without committing suicide.

If we cannot deny the archetypes or otherwise neutralize them, we are confronted, at every new stage in the differentiation of consciousness to which civilization attains, with the task of finding a new interpretation appropriate to this stage, in order to connect the life of the past that still exists in us with the life of the present, which threatens to slip away from it.

If this link-up does not take place, a kind of rootless consciousness comes into being no longer oriented to the past, a consciousness which succumbs helplessly to all manner of suggestions and, in practice, is susceptible to psychic epidemics.

With the loss of the past, now become "insignificant," devalued, and incapable of revaluation, the saviour is lost too, for the saviour either is the insignificant thing itself or else arises out of it.

Over and over again in the "metamorphosis of the gods," he rises up as the prophet or first-born of a new generation and appears unexpectedly in the unlikeliest places (sprung from a stone, tree, furrow, water, etc.) and in ambiguous form (Tom Thumb, dwarf, child, animal, and so on). ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 267

All psychic events are so deeply grounded in the archetype and are so much interwoven with it that in every case considerable critical effort is needed to separate the unique from the typical with any certainty.

Ultimately, every individual life is at the same time the eternal life of the species.

The individual is continuously "historical" because strictly time-bound; the relation of the type to time, on the other hand, is irrelevant.

Since the life of Christ is archetypal to a high degree, it represents to just that degree the life of the archetype.

But since the archetype is the unconscious precondition of every human life, its life, when revealed, also reveals the hidden, unconscious ground-life of every individual.

That is to say, what happens in the life of Christ happens always and everywhere.

In the Christian archetype all lives of this kind are prefigured and are expressed over and over again or once and for all. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 146

A symbol loses its magical or, if you prefer, its redeeming power as soon as its liability to dissolve is recognized.

To be effective, a symbol must be by its very nature unassailable.

It must be the best possible expression of the prevailing worldview, an unsurpassed container of meaning; it must also be sufficiently remote from comprehension to resist all attempts of the critical intellect to break it down; and finally, its aesthetic form must appeal so convincingly to our feelings that no arguments can be raised against it on that score. 69:401

Do we ever understand what we think ?

We only understand that kind of thinking which is a mere equation, from which nothing comes out but what we have put in.

That is the working of the intellect.

But besides that there is a thinking in primordial images, in symbols which are older than the historical man, which are inborn in him from the earliest times, and, eternally living, outlasting all generations, still make up the groundwork of the human psyche.

It is only possible to live the fullest life when we are in harmony with these symbols; wisdom is a return to them. ~Carl Jung, CW 8, Para 794

As we can see from the example of Faust, the vision of the symbol is a pointer to the onward course of life, beckoning the libido towards a still distant goal—but a goal that henceforth will burn unquenchably within him, so that his life, kindled as by a flame, moves steadily towards the far off beacon.

This is the specific life-promoting significance of the symbol, and such, too, is the meaning and value of religious symbols.

I am speaking, of course, not of symbols that are dead and stiffened by dogma, but of living symbols that rise up from the creative unconscious of the living man.

The immense significance of such symbols can be denied only by those for whom the history of the world begins with the present day. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 202

Why is psychology the youngest of the empirical sciences?

Why have we not long since discovered the unconscious and raised up its treasure-house of eternal images?

Simply because we had a religious formula for everything psychic — and one that is far more beautiful and comprehensive than immediate experience.

Though the Christian view of the world has paled for many people, the symbolic treasure rooms of the East are still full of marvels that can nourish for a long time to come the passion for show and new
clothes.

What is more, these images—be they Christian or Buddhist or what you will—are lovely, mysterious, richly intuitive.

Naturally, the more familiar we are with them the more does constant usage polish them smooth, so that what remains is only banal superficiality and meaningless paradox. ~Carl Jung, Basel Seminar, Para 11

The Catholic way of life is completely unaware of psychological problems in this sense.

Almost the entire life of the collective unconscious has been channeled into the dogmatic archetypal ideas and flows along like a well-controlled stream in the symbolism of creed and ritual.

It manifests itself in the inwardness of the Catholic psyche.

The collective unconscious, as we understand it today, was never a matter of "psychology," for before the Christian Church existed there were the antique mysteries, and these reach back into the grey mists of Neolithic prehistory.

Mankind has never lacked powerful images to lend magical aid against all the uncanny things that live in the depths of the psyche.

Always the figures of the unconscious were expressed in protecting and healing images and in this way were expelled from the psyche into cosmic space. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 2121

The gods of Greece and Rome perished from the same disease as did our Christian symbols: people discovered then, as today, that they had no thoughts whatever on the subject. On the other hand, the gods of the strangers still had unexhausted mana.

Their names were weird and incomprehensible and their deeds portentously dark—something altogether different from the hackneyed chronique scandaleuse of Olympus.

At least one couldn't understand the Asiatic symbols, and for this reason they were not banal like the conventional gods.

The fact that people accepted the new as unthinkingly as they had rejected the old did not become a problem at that time.

Is it becoming a problem today?

Shall we be able to put on, like a new suit of clothes, ready-made symbols grown on foreign soil, saturated with foreign blood, spoken in a foreign tongue, nourished by a foreign culture, interwoven with foreign history, and so resemble a beggar who wraps himself in kingly raiment, a king who disguises himself as a beggar?

No doubt this is possible.

Or is there something in ourselves that commands us to go in for no mummeries, but perhaps even to sew our garment ourselves? ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 26.

Anyone who has lost the historical symbols and cannot be satisfied with substitutes is certainly in a very difficult position today: before him there yawns the void, and he turns away from it in horror.

What is worse, the vacuum gets filled with absurd political and social ideas, which one and all are distinguished by their spiritual bleakness.

But if he cannot get along with these pedantic dogmatisms, he sees himself forced to be serious for once with his alleged trust in God, though it usually turns out that his fear of things going wrong if he did so is even more persuasive. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 28

To gain an understanding of religious matters, probably all that is left us today is the psychological approach.

That is why I take these thought-forms that have become historically fixed, try to melt them down again and pour them into moulds of immediate experience.

It is certainly a difficult undertaking to discover connecting links between dogma and immediate experience of psychological archetypes, but a study of the natural symbols of the unconscious gives
us the necessary raw material. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 148

Reverence for the great mysteries of nature, which the language of religion seeks to express in symbols hallowed by their antiquity, profound significance, and beauty, will not suffer from the extension of psychology to this domain, to which science has hitherto found no access.

We only shift the symbols back a little, shedding a little light on their darker reaches, but without succumbing to the erroneous notion that we have created more than merely a new symbol for the same enigma that perplexed all ages before us. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 428

Eternal truth needs a human language that alters with the spirit of the times.

The primordial images undergo ceaseless transformation and yet remain ever the same, but only in a new form can they be understood anew.

Always they require a new interpretation if, as each formulation becomes obsolete, they are not to lose their spellbinding power over that jugax Mercurius and allow that useful though dangerous enemy to escape.

What is that about "new wine in old bottles"?

Where are the answers to the spiritual needs and troubles of a new epoch?

And where the knowledge to deal with the psychological problems raised by the development of modern consciousness?

Never before has "eternal" truth been faced with such a hybris of will and power. ~Carl Jung, CW 16, Para 396

All the true things must change and only that which changes remains true. ~Carl Jung, CW 14, Para 503

All ages before us have believed in gods in some form or other.

Only an unparalleled impoverishment of symbolism could enable us to rediscover the gods as psychic factors, that is, as archetypes of the unconscious.

No doubt this discovery is hardly credible at present. ~Carl Jung, CW 9i, Para 50

It is only through the psyche that we can establish that God acts upon us, but we are unable to distinguish whether these actions emanate from God or from the unconscious.

Strictly speaking, the God-image does not coincide with the unconscious as such, but with a special content of it, namely the archetype of the self.

It is this archetype from which we can no longer distinguish the God-image empirically.

We can arbitrarily postulate a difference between these two entities, but that does not help us at all.

On the contrary, it only helps us to separate man from God, and prevents God from becoming man.

Faith is certainly right when it impresses on man's mind and heart how infinitely far away and inaccessible God is; but it also teaches his nearness, his immediate presence, and it is just this nearness
which has to be empirically real if it is not to lose all significance.

Only that which acts upon me do I recognize as real and actual.

But that which does not act upon me might as well not exist.

The religious need longs for wholeness, and therefore lays hold of the images of wholeness offered

by the unconscious, which, independently of our conscious mind, rise up from the depths of our psychic nature. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 757

God has indeed made an inconceivably sublime and mysteriously contradictory image of himself, without the help of man, and implanted it in man's unconscious as an archetype, the archetypal light: not in order that theologians of all times and places should be at one another's throats, but in order that the unpresumptuous man might glimpse an image, in the stillness of his soul, that is akin
to him and is wrought of his own psychic substance.

This image contains everything which he will ever imagine concerning his gods or concerning the ground of his psyche. ~Carl Jung, CW 11, Para 661


Carl Jung across the web:

Blog: http: http://carljungdepthpsychology.blogspot.com/

Google+: https://plus.google.com/102529939687199578205/posts

Facebook: Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/56536297291/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/grp/home?gid=4861719&sort=recent&trk=my_groups-tile-flipgrp

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/Carl-Jung-326016020781946/

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/purrington104/

Red Book: https://www.facebook.com/groups/792124710867966/

Scoop.It: http://www.scoop.it/u/maxwell-purrington

Twitter: https://twitter.com/MaxwellPurringt

WordPress: https://carljungdepthpsychology.wordpress.com/