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Sunday, May 8, 2016

Some Carl Jung Quotations XXXI




The practice of magic consists in making what is not understood understandable in an incomprehensible manner. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 314.


Whoever is in love is a full and overflowing vessel, and awaits the giving. Whoever is in fore thinking is deep and hollow and awaits fulfillment. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 253.


They [Patients] know, perhaps, what their faith ought to mean to them, but they have found to their cost how little can
be achieved with will and good intentions if the unconscious does not lend a hand. ~Carl Jung, CW 14, Para 751



In communing with himself he finds not deadly boredom and melancholy but an inner partner; more than that, a relationship
that seems like the happiness of a secret love, or like a hidden springtime, when the green seed sprouts from the barren earth,
holding out the promise of future harvests. ~Carl Jung, Mysterium Coniunctionis, Para 623.


Since the object of this endeavor [Alchemy] was seen outside as well as inside, as both physical and psychic, the work extended as it
were through the whole of nature, and its goal consisted in a symbol which had an empirical and at the same time a transcendental
aspect. ~Carl Jung, CW 14, Para 700.


For desire only burns in order to burn itself out, and in and from this fire arises the true living spirit which generates life according to
its own laws, and is not blinded by the shortsightedness of our intentions or the crude presumption of our superstitious
belief in the will. ~Carl Jung, CW 14, Para 192


The vision of the symbol is a pointer to the onward course of life, beckoning with the libido towards a still distant goal—but a
goal that henceforth will burn unquenchably within him, so that his life, kindled as by a flame, moves steadily towards the far-off
beacon. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 202


For as the son of his father, he must, as if often the case with children, re-enact under unconscious compulsion the unlived lives of his parents. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 307


It is not the purpose of a psychological typology to classify human beings into categories—this in itself would be pretty pointless. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 986


Hence a man’s greater liability to total despair, while a woman can always find comfort and hope; accordingly a man is
more likely to put an end to himself than a woman. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 805



As the individual is not just a single, separate being, but by his very existence presupposes a collective relationship, it follows
that the process of individuation must lead to more intense and broader collective relationships and not to isolation. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 758


The “relativity of God,” as I understand it, denotes a point of view that does not conceive of God as “absolute,” i.e., wholly
“cut off” from man and existing outside and beyond all human conditions, but as in a certain sense dependent on him; it also
implies a reciprocal and essential relation between man and God, whereby man can be understood as a function of God, and God as
a psychological function of man. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 412


The accumulated libido activates images lying dormant in the collective unconscious, among them the God-image, that engram
or imprint which from the beginning of time has been the collective expression of the most overwhelmingly powerful
influences exerted on the conscious mind by unconscious concentrations of libido. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 412


There are plenty of people who are not yet born. They all seem to be here, they walk about—but as a matter of fact, they are not yet born, because they are behind a glass wall, they are in the womb. ~Carl Jung, Kundalini Seminar, Page 28


They are in the world only on parole and are soon to be returned to the pleroma [fullness] where they started originally. They have not formed a connection with this world; they are suspended in the air; they are neurotic, living the provisional life. ~Carl Jung, Kundalini Seminar, Page 28.


You must believe in this world, make roots, do the best you can, even if you have to believe in the most absurd things—to believe,
for instance, that this world is very definite, that it matters absolutely whether such-and-such a treaty is made or not. ~Carl Jung, Kundalini Seminar, Page 29


You see, the shoot must come out of the ground, and if the personal spark has never gotten into the ground, nothing will come out of it; no linga [creative core] or Kundalini will be there, because you are still staying in the infinity that was before. ~Carl Jung, Kundalini Seminar, Page 29


Death is a drawing together of two worlds, not an end. We are the bridge. ~Carl Jung, J.E.T., Page 95.


Salome's performance was deification. ~Carl Jung, Liber Novus, Page 253. Footnote 211.


Just as a man brings forth his work as a complete creation out of his inner feminine nature, so the inner masculine side of a woman brings
forth creative seeds which have the power to fertilize the feminine side of the man. ~Carl Jung, CW 7, Para 336.


Christianity, like every closed system of religion, has an undoubted tendency to suppress the unconscious in the individual
as much as possible, thus paralyzing his fantasy activity. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 80


Wherever we can observe a religion being born, we see how the doctrinal figures flow into the founder himself as revelations, in
other words, as concretizations of his unconscious fantasy. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 80


The renewed God signifies a regenerated attitude, a renewed possibility of life, a recovery of vitality, because, psychologically speaking, God always denotes the highest value, the maximum sum of libido, the fullest intensity of life, the optimum of psychological vitality. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 301


We cannot, therefore, afford to be indifferent to the poets, since in their principal works and deepest inspirations they create from the very depths of the collective unconscious, voicing aloud what others only dream. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 323



Not the artist alone, but every creative individual whatsoever owes all that is greatest in his life to fantasy. ~Carl Jung, CW 6, Para 93