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Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Carl Jung: We don't know whether the collective unconscious is conscious of its images, but it might be.




Dr: Jung: I think that would be the most concise answer to my question.

This figure quite certainly represents the collective unconscious, and the fact that the unconscious is blind, that it does not see, is in its definition.
Dr: Jung: I think that would be the most concise answer to my question.

This figure quite certainly represents the collective unconscious, and the fact that the unconscious is blind,
that it does not see, is in its definition.

If the unconscious could see, there would be no unconscious, and we would be entirely superfluous.

Everything would be foreseen, we would have predestination with no freedom whatever, no chance of
free will.

That seems to be a statement of fact, but it does not quite explain why those great forces which have made
him what he is have made him blind at the same time.

You see, he would not say he had been made blind unless he assumed that he had once been able to see.

Now we don't know whether the unconscious has ever been able to see, but apparently
the old man could see, and then the same great forces that gave him his eyesight, or his importance,
rendered him blind. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Pages 1021-1022

Now in this vision the grandfather, the old man, is blind.

Blindness is very often the quality of the seer, for when his eyes to the world are blind, they look inward
and see the things within.

His attributes are the cross of blood, his garment embroidered with Chinese dragons, and at
his feet the lion carved in stone.

So two important attributes of the old man who sums up the collective unconscious, are, as we said,
the power embodied in the lion and the wisdom represented by the Chinese garment. ~Carl Jung,
Visions Seminar, Page 1021.

Dr. Jung: Yes, he cannot see our world, which means that we are the eyes of that man who lives
forever, because our consciousness is an eye that sees.

When one understands, one says, "I see."

A field of vision means a field of consciousness; consciousness is essentially an eye, an organ of
perception of the present instant which lasts a fraction of a second.

We have, as it were, a momentary consciousness, lasting between sixty and eighty years, let us say,
which is of course no time at all.

Moreover we live only from moment to moment, we always forget the past and do not see the future,
whereas the age-old man is that which is past as well as the future.

Therefore he is blind, while we have eyes.

Perhaps he has an inner consciousness, and we may be inside of him, that is possible.

There are philosophies about this man-the idea that there is an inner consciousness-but we cannot
prove it.

We don't know whether the collective unconscious is conscious of its images, but it might be.

Now upon his forehead is a cross of blood.

Who would be marked like that? ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1016


Everything would be foreseen, we would have predestination with no freedom whatever, no chance of free will.

That seems to be a statement of fact, but it does not quite explain why those great forces which have made him what he is have made him blind at the same time.

You see, he would not say he had been made blind unless he assumed that he had once been able to see.

Now we don't know whether the unconscious has ever been able to see, but apparentlythe old man could see, and then the same great forces that gave him his eyesight, or his importance,rendered him blind. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Pages 1021-1022

Now in this vision the grandfather, the old man, is blind.

Blindness is very often the quality of the seer, for when his eyes to the world are blind, they look inward and see the things within.

His attributes are the cross of blood, his garment embroidered with Chinese dragons, and at his feet the lion carved in stone.

So two important attributes of the old man who sums up the collective unconscious, are, as we said, the power embodied in the lion and the wisdom represented by the Chinese garment. ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1021.

Dr. Jung: Yes, he cannot see our world, which means that we are the eyes of that man who lives forever, because our consciousness is an eye that sees.

When one understands, one says, "I see."

A field of vision means a field of consciousness; consciousness is essentially an eye, an organ of perception of the present instant which lasts a fraction of a second.

We have, as it were, a momentary consciousness, lasting between sixty and eighty years, let us say, which is of course no time at all.

Moreover we live only from moment to moment, we always forget the past and do not see the future, whereas the age-old man is that which is past as well as the future.

Therefore he is blind, while we have eyes.

Perhaps he has an inner consciousness, and we may be inside of him, that is possible.

There are philosophies about this man-the idea that there is an inner consciousness-but we cannot prove it.

We don't know whether the collective unconscious is conscious of its images, but it might be.

Now upon his forehead is a cross of blood.

Who would be marked like that? ~Carl Jung, Visions Seminar, Page 1016

Carl Jung across the web:

Blog: http: http://carljungdepthpsychology.blogspot.com/

Google+: https://plus.google.com/102529939687199578205/posts

Facebook: Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/56536297291/

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Twitter: https://twitter.com/MaxwellPurringt

WordPress: https://carljungdepthpsychology.wordpress.com/

Great Sites to visit:

1. Jenna Lilla's Path of the Soul http://jennalilla.org/

2. Steve Jung-Hearted Parker's Jung Currents http://jungcurrents.com/


3. Frith Luton's Jungian Dream Analysis and Psychotherapy: http://frithluton.com/articles/