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Saturday, October 15, 2016

Some Carl Jung Quotations [LI]






There are indeed few authors, as you yourself have probably observed, who could wring
from themselves an objective evaluation of my work. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 555-557


Can man adopt any standpoint outside the psyche? He may assert that he can, but the assertion does not
create a point outside, and were he there he would have no psyche. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 555-557


Because it is tied to the timeless, the inferior function never wants to affirm the world of the moment, the world
of time, since it ·would rather cling on to timelessness. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. 1, Pages 93-94


The spirit of this time would like to hear of use and value. I also thought this way, and my humanity still thinks
this way. But that other spirit forces me nevertheless to speak, beyond justification, use, and meaning. ~Carl Jung,
The Red Book, Page 229


But I did not consider that the spirit of the depths from time immemorial and for all the future possesses a greater
power than the spirit of this time, who changes with the generations. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 229


The spirit of the depths has subjugated all pride and arrogance to the power of judgment. He took away my belief
in science, he robbed me of the joy of explaining and ordering things, and he let devotion to the ideals of this time
die out in me. He forced me down to the last and simplest things. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page229


The spirit of the depths took my understanding and all my knowledge and placed them at the service of the
Inexplicable and the paradoxical. ~Carl Jung, The Red Book, Page 229


Jesus wants not to succumb to the temptation; then, thanks to the function that results from every conflict, a
symbol appears: it is the idea of the Kingdom of Heaven, a spiritual kingdom rather than a material one. ~Carl
Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 267-269


Two things are united in this symbol, the spiritual attitude of Christ and the devilish desire for power. ~Carl Jung,
Letters Vol. I, Pages 267-269


Thus the encounter of Christ with the devil is a classic example of the transcendent function. ~Carl Jung, Letters
Vol. I, Pages 267-269


You can find a detailed exposition of the transcendent function in Goethe's Faust. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 267-269


The transcendent function is not something one does oneself; it comes rather from experiencing the conflict of
opposites. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 267-269


In a certain sense the symbol has a life of its own which guides the subject and eases his task; but it cannot be invented
or fabricated because the experience of it does not depend on our will. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 267-269



There can be no doubt that Dr. X.'s statements are projections of his "Jewish" anima. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 308-309



Watch your tongue, for it can sting. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 308-309



First we had (at the end of Oct.) a regrettable accident: my wife fell in the corridor (slipping on a carpet) and
broke her right arm in the shoulder a nasty fracture indeed. I had her in the hospital for 2 months. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 539-541


This privatio boni business is odious to me on account of its dangerous consequences: it
causes a negative inflation of man, who can't help imagining himself, if not as a source
of the [Evil], at least as a great destroyer, capable of devastating God's beautiful creation. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 539-541


I make no metaphysical assertions and even in my heart I am no Neo-Manichean; on the contrary
I am deeply convinced of the unity of the self, as demonstrated by the mandala symbolism. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 539-541


Hitler and Stalin go on representing a mere "accidental lack of perfection." [within Privatio boni]
~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 539-541


Evil is-psychologically speaking-terribly real. It is a fatal mistake to diminish its power and reality even merely
metaphysically. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 539-541



Evil verily does not decrease by being hushed up as a non-reality or as mere negligence of man. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 539-541


God is the mystery of all mysteries, a real Tremendum. Good and Evil are psychological relativities
And as such quite real, yet one does not know what they are. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 539-541


It seems to be the hierosgamos motif: the cut-down tree has been brought into the
cave of the mother, in this case: the hold of a ship. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 566-568


If the miracle of the Assumptio is not a living and present spiritual event, but consists of a physical
phenomenon that is reported or only believed to have happened some 2000 years ago, then it has
nothing to do with the spirit, or just as little as any parapsychological stunt of today. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 566-568



A physical fact never proves the existence and reality of the spirit. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 566-568


It is more than probable that the idea of the Assumptio did not begin its real life in apostolic times but
considerably later. ~Carl Jung, Letters Vol. I, Pages 566-568